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Lithuanian Out Loud is a podcast series designed for fans of the Lithuanian language. Come along with native Lithuanian author/lawyer Raminta and her North-American husband, Jack. They'll teach you Lithuanian along with tidbits about the history and culture of Raminta's homeland - Lietuva!

Music: Vieux Farka Toure - Ana {Pocket Remix} by pocketproductions (c) copyright 2007 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/pocketproductions/8916 Ft: Pocket (Richard Jankovich)

Jul 21, 2008

Hey, hey, hey!  This is Jack and welcome back to Lithuanian Out Loud!  We’ve got some great stuff for you today including an awesome installment of Agnė iš Vilniaus.  But before we get to it…

I forgot to mention on the last episode that we now have free pdf files for every episode of Lithuanian Out Loud on our blogpage.  A pdf file is simply a downloadable print version of our programs.  You can go to the page and download them or get them automatically using iTunes.  If you don’t have iTunes on your computer you should get it, it’s completely free.

One our listeners is Jim from Delaware.  Jim has created a chat room using Skype and it’s called "Learning to speak Lithuanian for English speakers.”  From what I understand this is a tool that beginner, intermediate and advanced speakers can use to practice Lithuanian.  Jim is inviting native speakers to join the chat room if they like.  We’ll post the web address of Jim’s chat room on the Lithuanian Out Loud blogpage.  Good luck with your project, Jim!

Today we have something special for our listeners.  Along with this episode I’ll include a downloadable electronic book that Andrius Repsys of Šiauliai, Lithuania is offering to everyone for free.  This is an awesome professional looking book that you can download to your computer, open and view.  It’s got tons of interesting facts about Lithuania including pictures, graphics and text.  You have to download it and look at it, you won’t regret taking the time.  Andrius Repsys is an artist from www.qhoto.net and not only has he done a fantastic job with his book, he was kind enough to give Lithuanian Out Loud some free advertising by placing our name on each page of his book.  Labai ačiū, Andriau!  That was a kind gesture.

Finally, we have some listeners who are traveling in Lithuania and some who live there.  We’d like to invite all of you to post your experiences on the Lithuanian Out Loud blogpage.  Have you had any interesting experiences?  Good or bad, doesn’t matter.  Have you learned any interesting words or phrases?  How are your travels?  As expected?  Better?  Worse?  Just post your comments on the blogpage.  Our community would love to read them. Alright, now here’s Agnė iš Vilniaus with an unbelieveable contribution!  Take it away Agne!

Hello, I am Agnė.  Even if you don’t know Lithuanian well, this song could be just the right thing for you to start singing Lithuanian.  Because this song has two voices and one of them is really, really, really simple.  It would be like this…

Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa

Actually, this tumbararasa doesn’t mean anything.  It’s just made to keep the rhythm.  Let’s repeat once more…

Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa

Now, you will continue like this and I will add another voice, okay, so you are continuing this fragment of tumbararasa and let Lithuanians do the rest.  Just totally relax, okay?  Let’s start!

Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa (etcetera)
 
Ėjo senis lauko arti, pasiėmęs pypkę karčią

An old man was going to sow a field, taking a bitter tobacco-pipe

Ėjo senis lauko arti, pasiėmęs pypkę karčią

An old man was going to sow a field, taking a bitter tobacco-pipe

and after this we need to learn the second part of this song which would be like this…

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Ready to repeat?  Okay, let’s start…one, two, three…

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia also means nothing, no meaning, but dainuok linksmai, dainuoti – to sing and linksmai – cheerfully, joyfully.  So, dainuok linksmai would be, sing cheerfully.

So, now let’s put together all the song.  Just mixing first part, second part, first part, second part and see what happens.  Ready!  Let’s go!

Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa
Tumba tumbararasa (etcetera)

Ėjo senis lauko arti, pasiėmęs pypkę karčią

An old man was going to sow a field, taking a bitter tobacco-pipe

Ėjo senis lauko arti, pasiėmęs pypkę karčią

An old man was going to sow a field, taking a bitter tobacco-pipe

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Ėjo boba tuo keleliu, rado pypkę ant kelmelio

An old woman was going the same way and found a pipe on a stump (diminutive form)

Ėjo boba tuo keleliu, rado pypkę ant kelmelio

An old woman was going the same way and found a pipe on a stump (diminutive form)

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi tu boba nekvailioki, man pypkutę atiduoki

Oh, you, old woman, don't tomfool, give me back my tobacco-pipe (diminutive form)

Oi tu boba nekvailioki, man pypkutę atiduoki

Oh, you, old woman, don't tomfool, give me back my tobacco-pipe (diminutive form)

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

Oi lylia oi lylia, oi lylia oi lylia
Oi lylia oi lylia, dainuok linksmai

That was super Agne!  What an awesome performance!  Thank you for taking the time to record this, transcribe it for us, send it to us and allow us to share it with the world.  Your contribution is priceless!  Ačiū milijoną kartų.  Thanks a million times.

---

Hi there, I’m Jack and I’m Raminta and welcome back to Lithuanian Out Loud where we offer the world the Lithuanian language.  Today we’re in the month of July which in Lithuanian is liepa.

Okay, I think we all agree that Lithuania is not one of the largest nations in the world.  But, the next time you’re tempted to say Lithuania is a small country, think about this.  Lithuania is larger than Denmark.  It’s bigger than Taiwan, Netherlands, and Belgium.  So, whenever I hear anyone mention Lithuania is small, I just tell them it’s not that small.  It’s bigger than Switzerland.

Today we’ll learn a new declension…

Pradėkime, let’s get started!

Oh!  Good idea, we should get started first!

Today we’ll learn a new declension.  It’s called the vocative or šauksmininkas.  Šaukti is the verb, to shout.  Šauksmininkas is the declension we use when we’re shouting at someone, when we’re speaking to someone, when we’re addressing someone or when we just want to get their attention.

Šauksmininkas is not difficult.  The declensions are simple, except for words that end in –as.  So, we’ll start with the words that end in –as and the rest will be easy.

Romas!                                           
Romai!

Dominykas!                                     
Dominykai!

Mindaugas, come here!                     
Mindaugai, ateik čia!

Vladas, stay healthy!                         
Vladai, būk sveikas!

Vladas, Vladas, I like this word Vladas.  Pretty name!  But, I don’t think it’s Lithuanian.  Vladas - Vladimir, it seems – Russian.

If a person’s first or last name ends in –as, then –as changes to –ai.

Jonas, look there!                             
Jonai, žiūrėkite ten!

Vytautas, stop buzzing!                     
Vytautai, nustok zysti!  (stop bothering)

Good morning Algirdas!                    
Labas rytas Algirdai!

Good evening Ąžuolas!                     
Labas vakaras Ąžuolai!

If a noun, which is not somebody’s name ends in –as, it changes to –e.  For example, the word for sir or mister is ponas. 

mister                                               
ponas

sir                                                    
ponas

Let’s get his attention.

mister!                                             
pone!

thank you, sir!                                  
ačiū, pone!

The word for father is tėvas.

father                                               
tėvas

Happy birthday, Father!                     
Su gimimo diena, Tėve!

Sweet dreams, Father!                       
Saldžių sapnų, Tėve!

Father!  I love you!  Tėve!                 
Aš tave myliu!

Technically, you could talk to a mountain if you like.

Good morning, Mountain! Labas rytas, Kalne!

Previously we went over professions such as padėjėjas - assistant or gydytojas – doctor.  If a noun ends with a suffix such as –tojas or –ėjas then this suffix changes to –tojau and –ėjau.

Doctor, I feel bad                             
Gydytojau, aš jaučiuosi blogai

Doctor, look here                              
Gydytojau, žiūrėkite čia

Driver, where is the restaurant?          
Vairuotojau, kur restoranas?

Driver, are you from Vilnius?             
Vairuotojau, ar jūs esate iš Vilniaus?

If a word ends in a diminutive such as –ukas or –iukas as in the diminutive names Justukas or Petriukas, just drop the –as.

Justukas!                                           
Justuk!

Petriukas!                                         
Petriuk!

So, there are the words that end in –as.  Big job!  All the rest are simple.

Here are the rest of the masculine words…

If a word ends in –is the suffix changes to -i!
If a word ends in –ys the suffix changes to -y!
If a word ends in –us the suffix changes to -au!
If a word ends in –uo the suffix changes to -enie!

Jurgis!                                             
Jurgi!

Karolis!                                           
Karoli!

Žaltys!                                             
Žalty!

Andrius!                                           
Andriau!

Antonijus!                                         
Antonijau!

There aren’t many words that end in –uo but here are three…

Person! – as in asmuo                        
Asmenie!

Stone! – as in akmuo                         
Akmenie!

Dog! – as in šuo                                
Šunie!

The feminine nouns are extremely easy.

If a word ends in –a the suffix changes to -a!
If a word ends in –ė the suffix changes to -e!
If a word ends in –is the suffix changes to -ie!
If a word ends in –uo the suffix changes to -erie!
Sesuo is the only feminine word which ends in -uo

Mrs. Malinauskienė!                         
Ponia Malinauskiene!

Good morning, madame                     
Labas rytas, ponia

Raminta, I’m hungry                         
Raminta, aš alkanas

Agnė, thanks for the help                   
Agne, ačiū už pagalbą

Dovilė, I’m cold                                
Dovile, man šalta

Žąsis is the word for goose.  Antis is the word for a duck.  We’ll use these two words here since they’re unusual.  They end in the letter “s” but they are feminine words.

Go away goose!                                
Eik šalin žąsie!

Duck!  Eat a little bread!                    
Antie! Valgyk truputį duonos!

Sister, does he speak Lithuanian?        
Seserie, ar jis kalba lietuviškai?

Sister, where is Karolis?                      
Seserie kur yra Karolis?

Puiku!  Excellent!  You made it to the end of another episode!  Puiku!

Alright!  That’s it for today!  Thanks for the download!  If you got anything out of this lesson please leave us a review on our iTunes page.

To leave us comments call our voicemail number that’s in the title of every show or call our Skype voicemail at Lithuanianoutloud – that’s one word, and leave us a message there.
If you’d like to see the Lithuanian spelling of any word in this series just go to WWW dot Lithuanian dot L I B S Y N dot com.  If you’d like to get these episodes every time a new one is available just go to iTunes and do a search for Lithuanian Out Loud and click subscribe.  It’s completely free.  But, if you don’t want to subscribe on iTunes, just send us an email asking us to alert you every time a new episode hits the internet.  And feel free to make copies of our episodes, put them on cds and pass them out to your friends.
Thanks to CCMixter.org, Ditto Ditto and Vieux Farka Toure for the podcast music.
Thanks for tuning in, tell your friends about us, we’ll see you on the next episode of Lithuanian Out Loud.
I’m Jack and I’ve never met a Lithuanian I didn’t like.  Viso gero!  Sudie!

To join Jim's Lithuanian Chat Room email him at:

captainjim04@msn.com

In the subject line of your email to Jim type:  Request Lithuanian chat link

http://www.Lithuanian.Libsyn.com
Skype voicemail:  Lithuanianoutloud
email Raminta and Jack at: lithuanianoutloud@earthlink.net 
http://www.vieuxfarkatoure.com/
http://www.ccmixter.org/