Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

Lithuanian Out Loud is a podcast series designed for fans of the Lithuanian language. Come along with native Lithuanian author/lawyer Raminta and her North-American husband, Jack. They'll teach you Lithuanian along with tidbits about the history and culture of Raminta's homeland - Lietuva!

Music: Vieux Farka Toure - Ana {Pocket Remix} by pocketproductions (c) copyright 2007 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/pocketproductions/8916 Ft: Pocket (Richard Jankovich)

Nov 28, 2007

Hello everybody, this is Jack and welcome back to Lithuanian Out Loud where you learn Lithuanian along with me, the beginner, and where my wife Raminta keeps us all in line.  Now, if you’ve been following the last few episodes you know that Raminta’s on the road right now and, honestly, when we started the Lithuanian Out Loud project we didn’t expect her to be traveling nearly as much as she is.  Of course, with her being on the road so much, recording lessons is a serious challenge.  Now, we’re working on some fixes like recording lessons over the phone or with Skype and some other ideas but until we perfect our yet to be discovered solution, we ask that you please bear with our technical difficulties.

One listener wrote in asking if it was possible to locate a book which conjugates a few hundred Lithuanian verbs.  You know, there are plenty of books available like that for Spanish, French, German, etc., but not so much for Lithuanian.  However, there is a book called 365 Lithuanian Verbs, but it’s out of print.  It’s unlikely, but you may be able to find one at an online used book store in the U.S. or Europe, but I doubt it.

Now, I don’t know about other nations but in the United States you can borrow a copy through an inter-library loan at your local library.  Once it arrives, I’m not saying you should make copies, but if you made your own personal photocopy and had that bound at your local Kinko’s store, for your own personal use, well, I doubt if Interpol will come looking to put you in handcuffs.

Also, we’d like to get more plugs from people for the show.  If you’d like to drop us a plug or just give us some comments on the show, call our Skype address, Lithuanianoutloud, it’s one word, and leave us a message on our voicemail.

Alright, today Raminta and I worked on this episode.  Again, the audio quality may not be perfect but for now it’s all we’ve got.  This lesson was inspired by a listener request and it’s the first of a five or six lesson series we’ll be doing on “love talk."   Aaaand away we go!

Let’s start off with the obvious.  How do we say, “I love you?"

Aš tave myliu          
I love you

Aš tave myliu          
I love you

Aš tave myliu          
I love you

Let’s take it a step farther.  Let’s say, I really love you!

Aš tave labai myliu    
I really love you

Aš tave labai myliu    
I love you a lot

Aš tave labai myliu    
I very much love you

Great, now, let’s greet the one we love by saying, “Hello love."
First, let’s greet a female…

labas meile!             
hi love!

labukas meile!          
hello love!

labuka meile!           
hi love!

Now let’s greet a male…

labas meile!             
hi love!

labukas meile!         
hello love!

labuka meile!           
hi love!

Another term of endearment is the word for “dear."
“Brangus" is the word for expensive or costly.  To a female we’d address her as “brangioji."

brangioji!                 
dear!

brangioji!                 
sweetie!

labukas brangioji!     
hello dear!

labuka brangioji!       
hi sweetie!

We’d address a male as, “brangusis."

brangusis!                
dear!

brangusis!                
dear!

labukas brangusis!     
hello dear!

labuka brangusis!      
hi dear!

The word for “sweetheart" would be mylimoji or mylimasis
We’d address a woman as “mylimoji"

mylimoji!                  
sweetheart!

labas mylimoji!          
hi sweetheart!

labukas mylimoji!      
hello sweetheart!

labuka mylimoji!        
hi sweetheart!

We’d address a male as “mylimasis"

mylimasis!                 
sweetheart!

labas mylimasis!        
hello sweetheart!

labukas mylimasis!     
hi sweetheart!

labuka mylimasis!       
hello sweetheart!