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Lithuanian Out Loud is a podcast series designed for fans of the Lithuanian language. Come along with native Lithuanian author/lawyer Raminta and her North-American husband, Jack. They'll teach you Lithuanian along with tidbits about the history and culture of Raminta's homeland - Lietuva!

Music: Vieux Farka Toure - Ana {Pocket Remix} by pocketproductions (c) copyright 2007 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/pocketproductions/8916 Ft: Pocket (Richard Jankovich)

Jan 14, 2008

Hi there, this is Jack and welcome back to Lithuanian Out Loud where the month of January is sausis and the lessons are on the house!  And now, here’s my beautiful wife Raminta and she’s going to share with us some more Lithuanian culture.  Welcome back Raminta.

Oh, thank you dear, I’m so happy to be back on Lithuanian Out Loud.  By now, we’re familiar with Perkūnas, the Lithuanian Thundergod.  One of his daughters was named Jūratė.  Her name comes from the word jūra which translates as, the sea.  Jūratė is the goddess of the sea, she rules the ocean, all sea life and she lived in an amber palace at the bottom of the Baltic Sea.  A fisherman named Kastytis was causing havoc.  He was tossing his nets into the sea and Jūratė went to demand he stop.  Once Jūratė saw Kastytis throwing his nets she fell in love with him and brought him back to her amber palace.  This made her father Perkūnas very angry.  He was angry because Jūratė was promised to marry Patrimpas, the God of Water.  Perkūnas destroyed the amber palace with a single bolt of lightning and killed her lover.  The palace was smashed and Jūratė was chained to the ruins forever.  When storms in the Baltic stir up the waters, pieces of the amber palace wash up on Lithuania’s shore.  If you find fragments in the shape of tears they are from the grieving goddess as she mourns for Kastytis.  It’s said you can hear Jūratė crying during Baltic Sea storms.  How sad!  Poor Jūratė!

Before we get to today’s lesson here’s a message from Nik in California in the United States. 

Hello Jack and Raminta, my name is Nik, I’m from Orange County, California and I’m taking your podcast lessons.  I am 50% Lithuanian and I’ve been wanting to learn Lithuanian because my family speaks it and I cannot understand a single word they’re saying to me.  I’ve only known a couple words because of me growing up I call my grandmother močiutė and my grandfather senelis it’s just a little weird when I hear them speak I think, “oh my gosh I can’t hear what they’re saying."  I have really no experience with Lithuania.  I’ve been wanting to go for a long, long, long time, ever since my Lithuanian family members was in Luxembourg and my family was irking me to go over there but I never got the chance to and I’m hoping to go there for the big, huge thousand year celebration in 2009.  I just discovered your podcast on iTunes and I thought ooh maybe it’s something I should take a shot at because I’ve never seen Lithuanian on the internet before and it is a great resource.  I’ve been trying to learn the language my grandma has said it’s really, really hard and it’s one of the oldest living Indo-European languages, I can find that very, very true from what you’re saying on this podcast.  It is a very great resource and I’ve been recommending it to all my friends, even to some of my professors, and they like it.  They’ve been doing little Lithuanian words of the day on the board, and everything, I sent an email to you guys just earlier and I have all these books on Introduction to Modern Lithuanian that are not helping because there’s no native speaker there present because of that so what you’re doing is a great job, just keep up the good work and keep adding more episodes, I just really want to learn, I’m on episode 17 right now, but I’m getting up there.  My grandma, I’m already talking to her in Lithuanian a little bit and she’s like, good job, just keep on learning and maybe we can have a full conversation.  Feel free to use my comments, just thank you very much, bye.

Thanks Nik!  Say hi to your grandparents from Raminta and I, again, thanks for your input, we’ll try to keep the episodes coming.

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This is our second love talk lesson.  The first was episode 0038.  Let’s say it’s early in the morning and it’s time to get up.  Let’s start the day off right! 
Kaip pasakyti lietuviškai?  How do you say it in Lithuanian?  Okay so, prašom pakartoti, please repeat…

Good morning sweetheart, time to get up!
To a female we would say…

Labas rytas mylimoji, laikas keltis!

laikas is vardininkas for time
keltis is the verb, to get up
prašom pakartoti…

Labas rytas mylimoji, laikas keltis!   
Good morning sweetheart, time to get up!

Labas rytas mylimoji, laikas keltis!   
Good morning sweetie, time to get up!

To a male we’d say…

Labas rytas mylimasis, laikas keltis!  
Good morning sweetheart, time to get up!

Labas rytas mylimasis, laikas keltis!  
Good morning sweetie, time to get up!

pabučiuoti is the verb to kiss or to give a kiss
Let’s start our day off right, let’s go get a little kiss, a little sugar.  We say the same phrase to a male or female…prašom pakartoti, please repeat…

pabučiuok mane prašau               
kiss me please

pabučiuok mane prašau               
kiss me please

pabučiuok mane!                         
kiss me!

Oh, that’s so nice!
apkabinti is the verb, to hug
We can say this to a male or female

pakartokite prašau
please repeat

apkabink mane prašau                 
hug me please

apkabink mane prašau                 
give me a hug please

apkabink mane!                           
hug me!

Well, no matter how much we love each other, sometimes we have to say goodbye…

bučiuoti is the verb to kiss

geros dienos, bučkis, ate! ate!       
have a good day, kisses, bye bye!

geros dienos, bučkis, ate!              
have a good day, kisses, bye!

geros dienos, bučkis, ate! ate!       
have a good day, kisses, bye bye!

or we could say…

geros dienos, bučiuoju, ate!         
have a good day, kisses, bye!

geros dienos, bučiuoju, ate! ate!    
have a good day, kisses, bye bye!

geros dienos, bučiuoju, ate!          
have a good day, kisses, bye!

bučiuoju basically translates the same as bučkis
literally bučiuoju means, I kiss
It comes from the verb bučiuoti - to kiss

Another way to say, kisses! as in a way to say goodbye is, bučinys.
However, bučinys is only used in a letter or email, so it’s mostly typed or written, not spoken.

Alright, the day is over, time to go to bed.  Let’s say, sweet dreams, love, goodnight.

saldus is the Lithuanian word in vardininkas for sweet
sapnas is vardininkas for dream

We say the same phrase to a male or female, please repeat, prašom pakartoti…

saldžių sapnų meile, labanakt      
sweet dreams love, goodnight

saldžių sapnų meile, labanakt      
sweet dreams love, goodnight

saldžių sapnų meile, labanakt       
sweet dreams love, goodnight

we’ve got five or six episodes planned for love talk so expect another lesson on this subject soon!  You made it through another lesson!  Sveikinu!  Congratulations!