Preview Mode Links will not work in preview mode

Lithuanian Out Loud is a podcast series designed for fans of the Lithuanian language. Come along with native Lithuanian author/lawyer Raminta and her North-American husband, Jack. They'll teach you Lithuanian along with tidbits about the history and culture of Raminta's homeland - Lietuva!

If you'd like to show some love for the podcast, we're happy to accept donations 🙂

 

 

Music: Vieux Farka Toure - Ana {Pocket Remix} by pocketproductions (c) copyright 2007 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/pocketproductions/8916 Ft: Pocket (Richard Jankovich)

Jun 13, 2010

Hi there, this is Jack.  

 

The reason we haven't published an episode for a few weeks is because my laptop crashed and I lost all the episode plans and all of the upcoming episode recordings; all gone, viskas.  To complicate the situation, Raminta is in Vilnius and won't be back for a couple of weeks.

 

I was stranded without a plan and without any recordings.

 

Thankfully, Romas and Daiva offered to help and we recorded a couple of episodes that we threw together at the last minute.  You'll hear Daiva in the background on this episode but you'll hear more of her on the next one.

 

In the recordings you might be able to tell I have a cold.  My voice is rougher than usual.

 

Also, a listener wrote me saying he has created a Facebook page for Lithuanian Out Loud.  So, if you're interested in Lithuanian Out Loud or Lithuania or the Lithuanian language you can join his group on Facebook.  Please be aware that this page wasn't created by Raminta nor myself, we don't moderate it and you cannot reach us there.  But, we think it's a great idea created by one of our fans.  Thanks!

 

Oh, and one other listener asked if we could leave a pause during regular episodes after the English, but before the Lithuanian is spoken.  She likes to guess on the pronunciation.  In the past we used to do this but then I started to feel like it made the episodes drag.  I hate to release boring episodes, but if it helps our listeners, we'll try to do it.  We'll do it in today's episode so everyone can try to guess at the pronunciation before the native speaker says it.

 

Alright, I think that's it for now.  On today's episode we discuss the Lithuanian words for this, that, these, those and that over there.  Enjoy the program. 

 

Hi there, I’m Jack and I’m Romas and welcome back to Lithuanian Out Loud where we offer the world the Lithuanian language.

 

Samogitia is the latin name for the Lithuanian region of Žemaitija, literally - lowlands.  Žemaitija is one of the five ethnographic regions of Lithuania.

 

Žemaitija is located in western Lithuania.  The people of Žemaitija speak Žemaičių kalba, a dialect of Lithuanian and the people are called Žemaičiai.

 

The most popular tourist destinations in Žemaitija are Palanga, Kretinga and Žemaičių Kalvarija.

 

Palanga is famous for its beaches.  

 

Kretinga hosts folk music festivals, theatricals, the Kretinga Festival, celebrations on Midsummer Night's Eve (Joninės), Mardi Gras (Užgavėnės), and a Manorial Feast.  

 

Every July in the city of Žemaičių Kalvarija there is a festival called, The Big Žemaičių Kalvarija Church Festival . It attracts many tourists from all over Lithuania and abroad. It is one of the few "must visit" locations for Roman Catholics of Lithuania. 

 

The coat of arms of Žemaitija depicts a black bear with silver claws and collar on a red shield topped with a crown.

 

Žemaitija

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samogitia

 

Today‘s episode became so long we decided to cut it up into two parts.  Here‘s part one...

 

Back in episode 51, Margarita said, “vadinasi “Double coffee.” She was talking about a coffee shop and she said it’s called, Double coffee.  The word vadinasi translates as, “is named,” for example,

 

is named

vadinasi…

 

consequently…

vadinasi…

 

that is…

vadinasi…

 

that means…

vadinasi…

 

Be careful with vadinasi.  I had thought vadinasi could be used like this, what is this called?  It’s called a dictionary.  What is that called?  It’s called a bridge.  You can’t use vadinasi this way.  Vadinasi is used when you’re asking what is the name or title of a thing.  For example, what is the name of the city?  What is the title of the song?  

 

the city is named Šiauliai

miestas vadinasi Šiauliai

 

the song is named “Love”

daina vadinasi „Meilė”

 

the country is named Lithuania

šalis vadinasi Lietuva

 

Now, if you just want to know the name of an object or a thing, such as a pencil, a table, a chair, etcetera, just ask like this…

 

what is it?

kas tai?

 

that is a lighthouse

tai yra švyturys

 

what is it?

kas tai yra?

 

that is a cemetery

tai yra kapinės

 

what is it?

kas tai yra?

 

that is a fire station

tai yra gaisrinė

 

what is it?

kas tai?

 

that is a fountain

tai yra fontanas

 

it’s more common in Lithuanian to say, kas tai yra instead of kas tas yra when asking a question

 

now let’s go over some ways to say, this, that, these and those in their masculine and feminine forms

 

that (masculine singular)

tas 

 

those (masculine plural)

tie

 

that (feminine singular)

ta

 

those (feminine plural)

tos

 

this (masculine singular)

šitas

 

these (masculine plural)

šitie

 

this (feminine singular)

šita

 

these (feminine plural)

šitos

 

a word that is synonymous with šitas or šita is šis or ši

 

this (masculine singular)

šis

 

these (masculine plural)

šie

 

this (feminine singular)

ši

 

these (feminine plural)

šios

 

now the word that describes something distant

 

that over there (masculine)

anas

 

those over there (masculine)

anie

 

that over there (feminine)

ana

 

those over there (feminine)

anos

 

anas

ana

anie

 

or anos – there is no such word, nah, nah

 

like, how would you say, “those islands?”

 

tos salos

 

no, you never say anos

 

you never, you’ve never…

 

anos salos

 

okay

 

ah - anos salos – you could, but we never use it

 

anos salos

 

yeah, you could use anos salos

 

okay, you always have to add for explanation, not this one but that one

 

if you want to do that then it will be way, way easier

 

yes, well, we’re saying, now the word that describes something like distance

 

but they don’t usually use it by itself

 

you usually don’t use this word by itself – anas

 

you usually say this – ne šitas bet anas (not this, but that over there)

 

you usually say, ne tie, bet anie (not those, but those over there)

 

you say, ne šita bet ana (not this, but that over there)

 

but if you use only one word you use, tas - ta, you know…

 

ne tos, bet anos - then it would be fine

(not those, but those over there)

 

ne tos, bet anos

 

okay, let's do it

 

not this one, but that one over there (masculine)

 

ne šitas, bet anas 

 

not these ones, but those over there (masculine)

 

ne šitie, bet anie

 

not this one, but that one over there (feminine)

 

ne šita, bet ana

 

not these ones, but those over there (feminine)

 

ne šitos, bet anos

 

it's good? yeah

 

okay, alright…

 

yeah, it's hardly ever used but that's okay

 

but in that case, in this sentence - combination, it is used

 

but, you almost never use anos, it's like a word…well, it's used a different way, anos

 

(merga - girl)

 

anos mergos, ne tos mergos, bet anos

 

ne šitos merginos, bet anos merginos

 

not these ladies, but those ladies

 

oh, good

 

okay, or, 

 

ne šitos mergaitės, bet anos mergaitės (girls)

 

mmm, okay, got it

 

ne šios mergaitės, bet anos

 

okay, so, you generally don't use anas, anie, ana, anos, unless you're doing a comparison

 

correct

 

okay, alright...

 

examples

pavyzdžiai

 

that (masculine)

tas

 

that bicycle

tas dviratis

 

that motorcycle      

tas motociklas

 

that helicopter

tas sraigtasparnis

 

I've never heard that word pronounced before - say it again

 

sraigtasparnis

 

tas changes to tie when describing plural masculine nouns

 

those bicycles

tie dviračiai

 

those motorcycles

tie motociklai

 

those helicopters

tie sraigtasparniai

 

that (feminine)

ta

 

that day

ta diena

 

that idea

ta idėja

 

that book

ta knyga

 

ta changes to tos when describing plural feminine nouns

 

those days

tos dienos

 

those ideas

tos idėjos

 

those books

tos knygos

 

this (masculine)

šitas

 

this truck

šitas sunkvežimis

 

sunkvežimis

 

and what is this here?

 

senis

 

senis

 

old man

 

oh, okay, yeah

 

oh, sniego senis

 

right, okay

 

sniego senis besmegenis

 

what is that?

 

that means the snowman, no brain

 

no brain snowman

 

that's a common saying?  

 

yeah

 

sniego senis besmegenis

 

when would you use that?

 

sometimes you don't say sniego senis

 

what are you doing outside?

 

we say, "I'm building besmegenis"

 

but sometimes besmegenis is used for teasing somebody, you know, did something, stupid, like…

 

besmegenis - brainless

 

ah, okay, alright

 

this snowman

šitas sniego senis

 

this moped

šitas mopedas

 

šitas changes to šitie when describing plural masculine nouns

 

these trucks

šitie sunkvežimiai

 

these snowmen

šitie sniego seniai

 

these mopeds

šitie mopedai

 

this (feminine)

šita

 

this fence

šita tvora

 

this parrot

šita papūga

 

this fork

šita šakutė

 

these (feminine)

šitos

 

these fences

šitos tvoros

 

these parrots

šitos papūgos

 

these forks

šitos šakutės

 

this (masculine)

šis

 

this truck

šis sunkvežimis

 

this snowman

šis sniego senis

 

this moped

šis mopedas

 

these (masculine)

šie

 

these trucks

šie sunkvežimiai

 

these snowmen

šie sniego seniai

 

these mopeds

šie mopedai

 

this (feminine)

ši

 

this fence

ši tvora

 

this parrot

ši papūga

 

this fork

ši šakutė

 

these (feminine)

šios

 

these fences

šios tvoros

 

these parrots

šios papūgos

 

these forks

šios šakutės

 

that over there (masculine)

anas

 

not this but that over there (masculine)

ne šis, bet anas

 

not this mountain, but that mountain

ne šis kalnas, bet anas kalnas

 

not this forest, but that forest

ne šis miškas, bet anas miškas

 

not this, but that cloud

ne šis, bet anas debesis

 

those over there (masculine)

anie

 

not these, but those over there (masculine)

ne šitie, bet anie

 

not these mountains, those mountains over there

ne šie kalnai, bet anie kalnai

 

not these forests, but those forests over there

ne šie miškai, bet anie miškai

 

not these clouds, those clouds

ne šie debesys, bet anie debesys

 

that one over there (feminine)

ana

 

not this one, that one over there (feminine)

ne ši, bet ana

 

not this hill, but that hill

ne ši kalva, bet ana kalva

 

not this island, but that island

ne ši sala, bet ana sala 

 

not this storm, that storm

ne ši audra, bet ana audra

 

because there are two different storms, okay

 

this happened today, actually, this happened today

 

yeah, tornadoes

 

kaip pasakyti, tornado, lietuviškai?

 

tornadas

 

those over there (feminine)

anos

 

not these, but those over there (feminine)

ne šitos, bet anos

 

not these hills, those hills

ne šitos, bet anos kalvos

 

not these islands, but those islands

ne šitos, bet anos salos

 

not these storms, but those storms

ne šitos, bet anos audros

 

Alright, that’s the end of part one of this topic.  On the next episode we’ll pick up here.  Thanks, Romai.  Ačiū tau.


T
ten and a half years ago

Dear Raminta and Jack,

I just discovered your website today, although I've been searching for a Lithuanian podcast for quite a long time - without much success till today.

I want to thank you for your efforts and keep going, I'd say!

You just made my day :-)

Warm greetings from Belgium,

- T

Susanne
ten and a half years ago

Labas iš Lietuvos! Esu Vilniuje ir man labai patinka! I've been here for a week and it's so great to be able to understand some Lithuanian and even talk a little. So, thank you Jack and Raminta for making Lithuanian Out Loud. / Susanne iš Švedija

C
ten and a half years ago

Hi Raminta and Jack.

I have been studying and listening to your podcasts for a couple of years now and have already learnt a lot that isn't in textbooks such as the short stories relating to the history of Lithuania. I am also reading textbooks relating to the Lithuanian language as well as talking with some of my Lithuanian friends on skype. But because of daylight savings here in Australia and the already large difference in time zones it is quite difficult to speak with anyone at the moment, I would have to wake up at 4 in the morning to communicate and as you can imagine that's just not practical. I am currently studying food and drinks and I am having trouble remembering and pronouncing the words correctly. Is it possible for you to make a lesson relating to food and drinks in the future? I would be greatly appreciative if you could. Thankyou very much in advance and look forward to hearing from you

~C